Events in Rome

Eventi a Roma

Botero's exhibition

The exhibition Giovanni Boldini, from 4 March to 16 July at the Complesso del Vittoriano - Ala Brasini, in Rome, is one of the most comprehensive and spectacular retrospectives to be held in recent years. It features the most representative oils and pastels in Boldini's oeuvre and works by other artists who were his contemporaries, as well as a small selection of drawings on paper and engravings. The show reconstructs step by step the outstanding career of this great Italo-French artist, who was not only one of the protagonists of that exceptional period and the brilliant anticipator of 20th-century modernity, but superbly conveyed and exalted female beauty in his works, revealing the innermost mysterious soul of the noble ladies of the period, whom he regarded as "fragile icons". The exhibition comprises about of approximately 160 works – some of which have been rarely seen in public before such as The Red Curtain (1904), Lady Reading (1875), Portrait of a Lady in White with Gloves and Fan (1889), Dark-Haired Lady in an Evening Gown (c. 1892), Portrait of Madame G. Blumenthal (1896) – from major private collections and museums throughout the world, including the Musée d'Orsay in Paris, the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin - Nationalgalerie in Berlin, the Musée des Beaux-Arts in Marseille, the Uffizi in Florence and last but not least the Museo Giovanni Boldini in Ferrara, which has the most important public collection of the master's works. The large canvas depicting Portrait of Donna Franca Florio (1901–1924) the masterpiece that has become the symbol of the Belle Époque and the happy Palermo of the day is also on display.

The Rose Garden

The gates to one of Rome’s most romantic gardens are open in spring at the foot of the Aventino Hill. In May, 1,100 rose varieties triumphantly blossom in innumerable colours and scents, adding their magic to an already very special park. These exceptionally beautiful grounds in fact also offer us a chance to forget the noise of the city traffic for one moment and enjoy a wonderful view onto the Circus Maximus (Circo Massimo) and the Palatine Hill. N.B. The rose garden is only open during a some spring months when the roses are obviously in flower

From Caravaggio to Bernini

Rome Scuderie del Quirinale museum from 14 April 2017 till 30 July 2017. Through a remarkable selection of paintings and sculptures, the exhibition 'From Caravaggio to Bernini. Masterpieces of the Italian Seicento from the Spanish Royal Collection' reflects the close political links and cultural strategies established by the Spanish court and the Italian states over the course of the 17th century. The art collections of the Hapsburg dynasty were enriched by the frequent diplomatic gifts from Italian rulers striving to earn the favour of the Spanish overlords, who with their domains – the Viceroyalty of Naples and the State of Milan – conditioned the development of the complex political situation in Italy from the mid-16th century onwards. This is the case with two of the most spectacular paintings on display, Guercino's Lot and His Daughters and Guido Reni's Conversion of Saul, which Prince Ludovisi donated to Philip IV with the aim of ensuring Spanish protection over the tiny State of Piombino. A large number of other artworks – including the magnificent Crucifix by Bernini from the Monastery of San Lorenzo de El Escorial, a work rarely accessible to the public – were commissioned or acquired by envoys of the king. Other works were commissioned or purchased – as in the case of Caravaggio's Salome – by representatives of the Spanish crown in Italy (ambassadors and viceroys), who were either despatched to the papal court or Naples, or bequeathed the works to the royal collection.

Vivian Maier

Rome Trastevere Museum from 17 March till 18 June 2018 The life and work of Vivian Maier are surrounded by an air of mystery that contributes to their fascination. Nanny by trade and photographer by vocation, her camera was her constant companion and capturing images with her Rolleiflex was a compulsion. It was in 2007 that John Maloof, a real estate agent at the time, bought a part of Maier’s archives, previously confiscated for an unpaid debt, at auction. He realised straight away that he had found a precious treasure and from that moment onwards, his search for material by this mysterious photographer was relentless and ultimately, he acquired more than 150,000 negatives and 3,000 prints. The exhibition boasts 120 black and white photos taken in the 50s and 60s, as well as a selection of others, in colour, that date to the 70s and a few super 8 films that show exactly how Vivian Maier approached her subjects. With an imposing yet discreet presence and a decisive and intransigent attitude, Vivian Maier photographed images of the cities she lived in – New York and Chicago – revealing an innate curiosity and an eye for details – small, particular and imperfect – as well as children, the elderly and the life that unfolded before her eyes in the streets, the city in general and its inhabitants, in a time of tumultuous social and cultural change. Hers are powerful images, electrifyingly beautiful, that prove her talent as a photographer. Her photographs were never shown or published during her lifetime, and the vast majority of her rolls of film were never even developed. It is as if Vivian Maier took her pictures purely for her own pleasure. Looking over her body of work, the number of self-portraits stands out. It is almost as if she wanted to leave a legacy for a public that she had neither wanted nor been able to deal with. Her austere gaze, reflected in windows and puddles, and her long shadow, looming over whatever she was photographing provide the key to drawing closer to this mysterious photographer. The exhibition allows the public to discover the enigma of an artistthat took a vast number of photographs that she never showed to anyone, but rather kept them as safe as if they were her most precious possession.

International of Tennis 2017

Rome Foro Italico from 10 May till 21 May 2017. Given the extraordinary success of the recent issues with the Foro Italico always sold out, you will not miss the show the ability to book and buy soon subscriptions and tickets, whose prices will not suffer any increase over the last edition. This year the tournament will occupy a 12-day period: the Parco del Foro Italico in fact open to the public Wednesday, May 10 with the pre-qualification tournaments and will give the opportunity for fans to follow the training sessions of the top players that anticipate their arrival the Masters 1000 Rome. The men's main draw will begin Sunday, May 14, and combined in the usual formula will continue until Sunday, May 21 fielding the spectacle of world tennis players, just like in the Grand Slam tournaments. Particularly attractive is the show of the first day of the tournament, when the true connoisseurs will admire the young champions who dominate the scene in the near future. The second numbered field will be the Next Gen Arena: 5,000 seats, excellent visibility, the scene of meetings at the highest level until Friday 19 May. Every day, here, a "long session" that presumably will end in the evening. As always there are three types of tickets. CENTRAL and Next Gen ARENA have specific coupons, then different: with the title of the first stage access can not enter into the second and vice versa. Both (limited to those of the daytime session) instead allow to follow, like the GROUND ticket, the match in progress since morning in all a further twelve fields, so-called secondary, the Foro Italico, the first of the stadium Nicola Pietrangeli.

Best price guaranteed


Booking directly through our site you always guaranteed the best price available and you can check the room availability in real time.